Panzer museum

Panzer III

Panzer III

Panzer IV

Panzer IV

I usually don’t post two or more images in one chapter, as I like the focus on the one capture. But in this case it fits rather well, the subjects being closely related (and probably not worth more text then written here).

What you are looking at are two iconic tanks from WW2, the Panzer III and Panzer IV, both in mint condition and owned by the “Panzer Museum Munster”. They had an open day and as were in the neighborhood, we planned a visit. So did about 15.000 other people … and soon after things started moving, the rain came in. Buckets and buckets of it.

But in between it was nice, if you like standing on your toes and shooting your camera held high above you to actually catch one of these vehicles without a head (or another camera held high) right in front of it.

It is astonishing to think that our history is, to say the least, lopsided with regard to the German army in WW2. I was raised with “Blitzkrieg”, “Tiger tank” and “armored vehicles”. In reality it took quite some time and heavy pushing by general Guderian – he was one of the few not to be seen as a war criminal during the Neurenberg trials – to get the tanks accepted as a specific force. Normal practice was that they supported the infantry and so were slow.

I also had the feeling that these tanks were big, but in reality only after the Tiger Panzer was introduced later in the war, tanks became as big as we see the nowadays. The Panzer III and Panzer IV are about half the size of a modern tank.

A last thought about history being strangely warped: the German Army was actually more horse driven and most soldiers marched. Tanks and specialist vehicles were used, but in lesser numbers than you’d perceive from pictures and movies.